Periodontist in Halifax | The Link Between Diabetes and Oral Health

Periodontist in Halifax, NS

Almost 26 million people in the US suffer from diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, having diabetes places you at a higher risk for periodontal disease and other oral health problems. Read on to learn more about the link between diabetes and your oral health.

Diabetes’ Effect on Oral Health

Glucose levels are a continuous concern for those dealing with diabetes. High glucose levels can create elevated sugars in your circulatory system, which can leave your teeth vulnerable. This can lead to an increase in tooth decay, salivary issues, gum disease, or even infection.

In addition, studies have shown that gum disease can have a negative effect on your glycemic control, which can aggravate your diabetes and further threaten your oral and overall health.

Concerning Symptoms

If you suffer from diabetes, then you may be at a higher risk for developing issues in your oral and periodontal health. Ensure you follow a regular schedule of dental visits as recommended. In addition, here are a few symptoms to keep watch for on your own time:

  • Tender, swollen gums that bleed easily
  • Dry mouth
  • Bad breath or taste
  • Oral thrush (a fungal infection)

If you experience these symptoms, then your diabetes may be complicating your oral health. Get in touch with our office to ensure your oral health stays protected.

How to Fight Back

You have ways to fight back against oral health issues stemming from diabetes. By keeping your blood glucose levels in line with your physician’s recommendations, you can reduce the amount of sugar your teeth are exposed to. The American Diabetes Association suggests using toothpaste that has an antigingival or antibacterial agent to help protect your gums. In addition, ensure you are following a schedule of dental visits at least twice a year. Let our team know that you have diabetes when you arrive so that we can provide you with the proper care and treatment you deserve.

Diabetes doesn’t have to control your oral health. Understand the effects it may cause and use these tips to keep your smile bright and your health optimal. Contact us for your next dental visit.

Halifax Periodontist | 7 Ways to Combat Bad Breath

Periodontist in Halifax, NS

Halitosis, commonly known as bad breath, is commonly associated with certain foods. Garlic, onion, and cabbage can all cause a foul odor and taste for several hours after you’ve eaten them. This type of temporary halitosis is easily solved by avoiding the foods that cause it. However, in some cases bad breath is a chronic problem that simply changing your diet won’t solve.

Long-term bad breath is caused by the presence of bacteria in your mouth. These bacteria are most often found on the back of the tongue and thrive when your mouth is dry. There are a variety of ways you can help reduce or eliminate chronic bad breath. Some of these include:

Practice good oral hygiene.

Brush your teeth after you eat as often as possible and at least twice daily. Clean between your teeth using dental floss or another interdental (between teeth) cleaner at least once each day. Food particles between teeth will break down slowly and cause unpleasant odors and tastes.

Brush your tongue.

Even if you brush and floss your teeth as recommended, the bacteria causing your bad breath may remain on your tongue. Use a tongue scraper or toothbrush to gently scrape away any particles of food or bacteria every time you brush. For best results, place the scraper or brush as far back as you can manage without gagging. This will generally become easier over time.

Keep well-hydrated.

Dry mouths allow bacteria to thrive. By drinking plenty of water, you can help prevent the bacteria growth and reduce or stop bad breath.

Avoid bad breath triggers.

Onions, garlic, cabbage, coffee, and tobacco products are all known to cause bad breath.

Chew sugarless gum.

By chewing sugarless gum, you increase saliva production and keep your mouth moist. This helps slow or prevent bacteria growth, minimizing chances of bad breath.

Improve your diet.

Crunchy fruits and vegetables, yogurt, and foods rich in vitamins C and D all work to prevent the growth of bacteria, keep your mouth cleaner, and increase saliva flow.

See your dentist.

Follow your regular schedule of dental hygiene appointments and exams. If you have tried the tips above without improvement, make an appointment for an exam to see if there may be an underlying condition that requires treatment. Treat any oral illnesses, such as decayed teeth, periodontal (gum) disease, or infection.

For more information about the potential causes and treatments for halitosis, contact our office.

Suite 209, 1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3TI

(902) 406-GUMS
(4867)

Periodontist in Halifax | What is Periodontal Disease?

Periodontist in Halifax, NS

Periodontal disease ranges from a mild inflammation of the gum tissues to periodontitis, a major oral disease that can result in soft tissue and bone damage. Periodontitis is the leading cause of adult tooth loss in the United States.

One of the major causes of gum disease is practicing poor oral hygiene habits. Daily brushing and flossing and regular professional exams and cleanings are essential to maintaining optimal oral health. When these practices are not followed, plaque can form on the teeth and along the gumline. If this plaque is not properly removed, it may harden over time and become tartar. Once that occurs, only a dental professional can remove the tartar from teeth.

If gum disease is not treated in a timely manner, tartar may continue to build unchecked. When this occurs, the gum disease may advance to gingivitis. In this stage, gums redden, swell, and become prone to bleeding from normal activities, such as brushing or eating. Some other common symptoms include: chronic halitosis (bad breath), sensitive teeth, and difficulty or pain with chewing. At this point, professional periodontal treatment is needed to prevent the gingivitis from advancing to periodontitis.

When gingivitis is not treated in time, it may become periodontitis. Periodontitis is the most advanced form of periodontal disease. With periodontitis, gums begin to pull away from the teeth, creating small “pockets” along the gumline. These spaces are highly difficult to clean without professional intervention and can lead to rapid worsening in overall oral health. Without prompt and thorough treatment, bone, gums, and soft tissues may be destroyed by periodontitis.

Some of the most common factors that contribute to periodontal disease developing include poor oral hygiene habits, diabetes, smoking, and hormonal changes in women. Some medications can cause gum tissue to grow abnormally, which can increase difficulty in proper cleaning of the teeth. People who are receiving treatment for AIDS are also at increased risk of developing periodontal disease.

Many recent studies have found that untreated periodontal disease may negatively impact other aspects of your overall health, especially for patients with cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Periodontal disease can also increase the risk of developing certain pregnancy complications, such as low birth weight or premature birth.

Our doctor has the training and experience to diagnose and treat every stage of periodontal disease. If you have symptoms of periodontal disease, contact our office to schedule a consultation.

Suite 209, 1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3TI

(902) 406-GUMS
(4867)